Filed under Top Stories

“Popularity” How We Really Feel

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

Popularity. It affects all of us in one way or another, whether you’re considered “popular” or not. While I have an opinion and so do you, they’re probably different in some way. Here are what some of your fellow students think about the social hierarchy that has weaseled its way into our school.

When we interviewed eighth graders Daniel Steele and Trey King, they both agreed with the idea that popularity tends to negatively affect everyone unless you’ve been deemed “popular” by other people. “People want to be around certain people more than others.It’s better when you’re one of them,” said Trey. They also think that because people hold value in popularity,  popular kids will act out in class because they are trying to appeal to other “well liked” kids. Eighth grader Jacob Mosher was able to corroborate this: “They do this almost to impress other people,” he said. As you can probably see, this shows that different people with different friends tend to feel the same on this issue.

While seventh grader Victoria Keka definitely notices the different groups of people, she didn’t feel as strongly about the negative impact it can have as the eighth graders did. “A lot of popular kids are nice. It really depends,” she said when asked about kids’ behavior. Now this could be that they’re friends with different people or simply view the topic and the people it pertains to differently, but either way there’s a hefty difference in the way an eighth grader thinks about this and the way a  seventh grader thinks about this.

To be honest, I was kind of surprised when I heard, sixth grader Kevin Byrd’s response to how “popular kids” act in class and how their behavior is different. He said,  “They think they can get away with it and will get more friends that way.” Quite frankly I was baffled by the fact that he viewed it in the same way that the eighth graders did. The one point  that everyone agreed on was that when someone, whether they’re “popular” or not, acts out in class to appeal to people, it doesn’t work. Everyone said that acting out in class to make more friends doesn’t work and can make you look like foolish.

Alright, you’ve heard sixth, seventh, and eighth graders talk about this. Now it’s your turn. How do you feel about popularity in our middle school?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Top Stories

    Travel Questions with Joe!

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Top Stories

    Sixth Grade Camp

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Top Stories

    The Butterfly Project

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Top Stories

    weekly scoop

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Top Stories

    Warner Performs Annie Jr. For All To Come and Enjoy

  • Top Stories

    Girl Power, Am I Right?

  • Top Stories

    Travel Questions with Joe!

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Features

    Interview with Mr. Averill

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Features

    Interview with Mrs.Stamm

  • “Popularity” How We Really Feel

    Comics

    Captain Carl: The First Encounter